Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Scorched


Scorched is book one in the Scorched series by Mari Mancusi. The easiest way to describe this series is that it is the cross between The Terminator and that dragon apocalypse movie with Matthew McConaughey/Christian Bale, Reign of Fire. Not to sound like Stefon from Saturday Night Live, but this book has everything, dragons, time travel, evil twins, maybe not so evil twins, love triangles, men in black, secret societies, cults, telepathy... and that already might be saying too much.

Trinity Foxx is trying to be a normal girl. Emphasis on trying. Her mother committed suicide, her did is out of the picture, and she has been living with her eccentric grandfather. She is also trying to keep her grandfathers fossil/roadside attraction museum afloat. Then he goes and buys what he calls a dragon egg that he paid someone to dig out of the arctic. Connor and Caleb are twin brothers from the future whose father was killed by a dragon. They have taken different paths ever since. Connor goes back in time to destroy the egg and prevent the word from being burned up by dragons. Caleb goes back in time to save the last dragon egg and help Trinity and her dragon user in a new age of peace and prosperity where dragons will save humanity.

If you have not already read Scorched, you will probably pick this trio as the love triangle and you will be correct. But love triangle might be too strong of a word. I knocked one of Mari's other books, Tomorrow Land, a bit for having a bit much teen angst and romance. And yes, I know it is a YA book. But FYI, I still enjoyed that novel. In scorched, while Trinity does develop feelings for each of the brothers, there is no big romantic subplot here. The focus is mainly on Trinity's evolution. The book has a pretty quick pace as Trinity's world falls apart and begins again with a dragon. There are some good twists in the story. Mari does a good job at keeping you wondering who the evil twin is, or are they both just being manipulated. And are dragons really all that bad or will they scorch the earth?

I enjoyed this book and while mixing the fantasy genera of dragons with the sci-fi element of time travel might seem a bit too much to handle in one story, Mari does strike a good balance. The method of time travel isn't explained in this book. It might later on, but unless you are a picky about that kind of thing, the story doesn't really need to get technical. If you can suspend your disbelief about dragons in the modern world, then you should not be bothered by the lack of technicalities of time travel. I didn't bother me. I look forward to the next books, Shattered and Smoked.

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